Accepted Symposia

  1. Processes, Practices & Policies to Promote the Inclusion of Youth in the Public Realm

  2. Time for food growing? Exploring relationships between food growing, wellbeing and sustainable environments over time

  3. Mental maps from collective memories, social relationships and social positions

  4. Home, appropriation and time in the experience of migration, expatriation and temporary residence

  5. Long-term studies - benefits and pitfalls

  6. Intergenerational place-making: Addressing health and wellbeing for diverse communities

  7. Do older adults have ‘’the right’’ to age-in-the-right-place?

  8. Approaches to bridge communication challenges for nature conservation, sustainability, and health promotion

  9. Autonomy and independence in urban environments. Between youth and old age, what inequalities and opportunities over life cycles?

  10. Developing Patterns of Resilience through Deep Time

  11. From mitigation to adaptation behaviors: Understanding resilience and its long-term challenges

  12. Renovating public schools for future generations: an international comparison of programs and approaches

  13. Using Familiar, but Diverse, Methodologies to Help People adapt to new Technologies in Contemporary Environments

  14. Recovering the past to plan the future: Walkability as an alternative for sustainable mobility in cities

  15. Inhabitant Photo-elicitation Interviews Reported to Architects Who Designed a Building

  16. Re-conceptualizing architectural and urban design education through a people-centred, multidisciplinary integrative approach

  17. Sins of omission: "The environment's in trouble, but I'm not doing much to ameliorate the problem"

  18. The role of lighting design for walking in urban settings

  19. Time, health and sustainability in work and life – new ways of working at universities, outdoors offices, and urban co-living

  20. Research Methods’ Timeline: 50 years of People-Environment Studies

  21. Addressing Youth Incarceration: Trauma and Decarceration in Research and Practice

 

1. Processes, Practices & Policies to Promote the Inclusion of Youth in the Public Realm

Convenor(s):

  • Patsy Eubanks Owens, University of California, Davis,  peowens@ucdavis.edu

  • Sarah Little, University of Oklahoma

  • Adina Cox, University of Kentucky

  • Janet Loebach, Cornell University

The ability of youth to enjoy public spaces and to develop a sense of belonging and attachment to these environments, is critical for their physical, social, cognitive, and emotional development. Young people are a vital citizen group with legitimate rights to occupy and shape their public environments. However, youth are often prevented from using public spaces as a result of geographic isolation, discriminating actions from others in the space, restrictive community policies or ordinances, or negative perceptions of youth. In addition, some youth may be marginalized and prevented from freely using or feeling welcome in public spaces due to their social or cultural identity, or their economic status or resources. Youth can also be deliberately designed out of public environments or thwarted by designs which unintentionally make it difficult for them to use these public spaces. Lastly, young people are also often excluded from genuinely participating in the planning of public, outdoor environments.

The symposium aims to provide researchers and design professionals with evidence and tools to help them effectively advocate for more youth-inclusive public environments. The session concludes with an interactive discussion, including the identification of remaining gaps in research, policy, and advocacy efforts.

2. Time for food growing? Exploring relationships between food growing, wellbeing and sustainable environments over time

Convenor(s):

What is the role of time in relation to food growing? The benefits of food growing for human and environmental health and wellbeing are well understood and documented. Food growing has the potential to (re)connect us to the land and to nature, to create strong and resilient communities, to increase biodiversity and improve greenspaces, and to address climate change through reducing carbon emissions. It has beneficial effects for mental and physical health and wellbeing, and contributes to improved nutrition and dietary health. Yet it is not without challenges. While food growing is becoming increasingly popular in many urban areas, many people often say they lack the time or the skills to engage fully. Land for food growing is under pressure from other needs for housing, recreation or development. It is difficult for small-scale growers and farmers to compete with agri-intensive producers and large scale retailers that dominate our complex food systems. Despite these difficulties, food growing is receiving widespread popular and policy support. In the global north urban municipalities are drawing up local food policies, and creating multi-sector agencies to encourage and support food growing and local food. In the global south land sovereignty movements such as Via Campesina campaign for land reclamation for food growing to maintain livelihoods of small scale farmers. The histories of food growing demonstrate the ways in which it has been used to connect people to their environments through cultural practices, festivals and sharing; to make claims about sovereignty through land reclamation; to create and strengthen community resilience; to address climate change; and to provide therapy and rehabilitation. Intergenerational aspects include sharing skills, knowledge and traditions linking people to place and the past, and preserving heritage varieties that carry meanings for communities and link them to the land and the past.


This symposium calls for papers that address the timely aspects of food growing, past and present. How does time, or perceived lack of time, influence people’s ability to grow their own food in present times? How much time and effort goes into developing multi-sector governance for a local food policy? Can food growing accelerate the transition to a more sustainable food system in time to stop climate change? What has been the role of food growing in the past in times of crisis and change? This symposium welcomes these and other contributions that look at the role of time in food growing, and how understandings and meanings of the role of food growing in society have changed and are changing over time.

3. Mental maps from collective memories, social relationships and social positions

Convenor(s):

 

The environmental issues we face have been stated 40 years ago for some and even earlier for others. While technological developments have made it possible to meet some major challenges (the ozone depletion, for example), behavioural changes are slower and more difficult to implement. This last approach relies mainly on the accumulation of individual “good” practices to solve environmental problems. The preferred scale of analysis is the individual one, and it is resistance linked to habits (Bouscasse et al., 2018), a lack of information (Ek, Söderholm, 2010) or insufficient environmental concern (Schultz 2001) that are investigated. Recently, it is also from social dimensions that environmental issues are being addressed. Historical science has contributed significantly to this perspective (Fressoz and Locher, 2015), and then explores the historical effects of economic models (Fressoz, 2016). The novelty is no longer limited to individual pro- or counter-environmental behaviours, but also to consider social relationships or social structures to understand and address environmental problems. Thus, environmental behaviour is much more a social practice than an individual conduct. To what extent can socio-cognitive representations of space participate in this new approach to environmental problems? To what extent do the representations of geographical space reflect both social practices (Dias and Ramadier, 2018), socialized evaluations (Ramadier and Moser, 1998, Marchand, 2005) and collective memories (Haas, 2004). 

 

Integrating representations of geographical space into socio-historical approaches should make it possible to better understand current resistance to change and help to overcome some of them. This symposium proposes five ways of social and symbolic dimensions of the people-environment relations by the "mental maps".

 

4. Home, appropriation and time in the experience of migration, expatriation and temporary residence

Convenor(s):

Transnational migration, study and career related international mobility, as well as temporary residence are major decisions based on principal motivators in life. They often imply a high personal, psychological and social price for the gains temporary dwellers, migrants or international students and workers hope to make by moving to a new place or country. Among those potential gains, achieving a sense of being at home in the host place constitutes one of the most valued hoped-for outcomes. The general aim of this symposium is to advance the understanding of that particular outcome by focusing on the dynamics of time, place transformation and appropriation in the host living environment.

More specifically, this symposium will pay attention to the processes by which migrants, temporary dwellers, students and career oriented expatriates achieve a sense of being at home in their new environment through (1) the spatial transformations of the city, i.e. the appropriation and domestication of everyday living spaces, street or neighborhood they inhabit (2) the practices and experiential dynamics underlying the emergence of the feeling of being at home in a given place or host country as well as the characterization of that particular experience of home (3) the meaning of things and of the material culture of moving at different stages of the process leading to one’s sense of being at home in the new place or host country.

5. Long-term studies - benefits and pitfalls

Convenor(s):

  • Sigrun Kabisch, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, sigrun.kabisch@ufz.de

  • Sébastien Lord, University of Montreal

People-environment relations are not static, but in constant change over time. Hence, they cannot be considered independently from the changing local and temporal context in which they are embedded. Unfortunately, most investigations are missing a long-term perspective. Many focus just on a single point in time and work with cross-sectional data. But it needs a closer look at the time course to grasp the complexity and contradictions of people-environment-relations. Based on a common conceptual foundation, we want to discuss long-term studies as one appropriate research design for examining these multidimensional interrelations.

In scientific literature, different terminologies emerge in conjunction with research projects over a long period of time. The most widespread term in social sciences is longitudinal study, defined as investigation of social phenomena over time. But a significant distinction has to be made between longitudinal design and longitudinal data. Many social scientists draw on already existing secondary longitudinal data and analyze them retrospectively. In fact, the investigation itself is a short-term project, but often named longitudinal study. The focus of the symposium is on prospective longitudinal research designs that actually take place over a long period of time. Therefore, the term long-term study seems to be more appropriate, because it underlines the temporal dimension of the whole investigation. Against this theoretical backdrop, the first objective of the symposium is to clarify a common conceptual understanding.
Depending on research purpose, longitudinal designs are very multifaceted in methodology (qualitative, quantitative or both), selection of investigation units (households or dwellings) or geographical scale. Panel studies (often synonymously used with longitudinal studies) and follow-up-studies are popular types of sociological long-term research to analyze changes over time. Even after choosing a suitable methodology, a long-term study itself remains an on-going process which demands a big portion of patience from scientists. Additionally, shortage of temporal, financial and human resources or missing commitment of politics makes it difficult to realize repeated studies over a long period. These are reasons why long-term observations, despite of their methodological benefits, are more of an exception in social research. This symposium provides a framework to reflect on the advantages and pitfalls of long-term approaches.

For examining people-environment relations, the realization of long-term studies implicates several practical benefits. The temporal dimension of longitudinal research designs provides a unique possibility to analyze cause-effect-relationships, and facilitates a better understanding of biographical and social processes and their influencing factors. Furthermore, historical developments, breaks, and turning points as well as their long-term effects can be illustrated. A critical reflection on transformations that shape people-environment-relations is necessary to derive implications for policy and future research.

In summary, the symposium serves as a forum for researchers to exchange their experiences with long-term studies and illustrate them by selected case studies. Furthermore, it offers the opportunity to introduce unique ideas and proposals for further long-term research.

6. Intergenerational place-making: Addressing health and wellbeing for diverse communities

Convenor(s):

Creating spaces that cater exclusively for one group can create schisms across generations and increase the invisibilisation of population groups such as older people, homeless people or youth with mental health issues; normalising their absence while pathologizing their presence (Phoenix,1987). This symposium focuses on linking together notions of age, placemaking and intergenerational relationships to provide ways forward for designing and developing inclusive communities and cities for our increasingly diverse populations.

As a collection, the papers build on Kaplan, Sanchez and Hoffman’s (2017) suggestion that, “strong intergenerational relationships are not only at the root of healthy and productive aging; they are also an important component of sustainable and liveable societies,” through ensuring that intergenerational placemaking is as much about challenging ageist stereotypes and exclusionary practices, as it is about: providing the resources, narratives and opportunities for mutual support; extending and strengthening social ties; and exchange of skills and shared learning.  The coming together of different generations in purposeful, equitable and participatory activities can provide space for positive intergenerational connectedness where identities are reformed and mindsets changed. This symposium thus provides a mechanism for forefronting intergenerational working with a strategic approach, centered on the creation of mutually beneficial spaces.

7. Do older adults have ‘’the right’’ to age-in-the-right-place?

Convenor(s):

As individuals age and their physical, mental, and social worlds change, so do their housing and support needs. Parallel to the trends in population aging in North America, there have been significant shifts in the availability and affordability of housing, due in part to increasing costs of home ownership, tax burden, and home maintenance. Amidst rising costs of housing and changing personal needs, considerations about the appropriateness and accessibility of housing are becoming increasingly salient for older adults. While it has been widely acknowledged that older adults would prefer to age-in-place, recent re-framing of this trend promotes the ideal as aging-in-the-right-place. However, only very recently has consideration been given to recognizing housing as a human right. Thus, while the individual goal to age-in-place is well accepted, there is lag in society’s understanding of the fundamental rights to housing. An exploration into how these ideals can coexist for low-income older adults is imperative. 

 

This symposium will provide an updated understanding of how to support older adults’ ability to age-in-the-right-place, regardless of income or physical, mental, or social status. As a collection, the presentations will advance theoretical understanding of social justice issues surrounding the conceptualization of aging-in-the-right-place, while identifying innovative approaches and promising practices that support low-income and homeless older adults to age with dignity in their place of choice. The cross-cutting themes that will emerge from this symposium will help to inform policy and practice regarding the right to age-in-the-right place.

8. Approaches to bridge communication challenges for nature conservation, sustainability, and health promotion

Convenor(s):

  • Eike von Lindern, University of Applied Sciences Darmstadt, Germany and Dialog N, Switzerland, eike.von.lindern@dialog-n.ch

  • Maria Johansson, Lund University

Globally environmental managers face challenges in balancing management and conservation efforts to reach international and national targets for biodiversity, and at the same time providing access to nature in order to ensure people’s livelihood, health and well-being. A lack of mutual exchange among practitioners, environmental managers and researchers has been identified and this hinders implementing successful campaigns which aim at promoting sustainable behavior. When planning, conducting, and evaluating campaigns practitioners and managers mainly rely on their own or institutional experiences. Researchers, however, do not ensure that their findings can be transferred into practice. Practical knowledge is rarely integrated into research, while findings are seldom applied in practice. Efforts to bridge this gap have a strong potential to increase the efficacy of campaigns and to contribute to theory-development. Therefore, this symposium aims to discuss how environmental psychology can facilitate the integration of systematic evaluation of the human dimension of management interventions introduced, and thereby build capacity for holistic approaches to nature conservation efforts. In particular, the role of psychological approaches in communicative efforts introduced by managing authorities will be discussed. Presentations exemplify with the results of evaluations of specific communication interventions by examining communication processes and challenges in applied projects with a management focus (e.g., management of large carnivores and geese), also linking between individual appraisals and the collaborative settings introduced in the management. Further, a comprehensive and theory-driven planning and communication model that was developed to bridge the gap between research and practice will be discussed. The model combines theories from social-, health- and environmental psychology as well as insights from communication research to a stage and process framework. It provides a guideline for environmental managers on how to integrate knowledge from research in their work, and how to evaluate campaigns so that practical experiences inform research. This approach is based on research from environmental and health psychology and therefore, the symposium will also explore how health psychology may inform biodiversity management and conservation. 

9. Autonomy and independence in urban environments. Between youth and old age, what inequalities and opportunities over life cycles?

Convenor(s):

Independence and autonomy are two essential psychosocial processes that characterize the individual’s mastering of spatial mobility and related territories. Different crucial moments of the life course appear fundamental with this respect: childhood, adolescence, active life, retirement, or old age. Other events, less predictable, may also interfere with the process of autonomy by influencing freedom of choice or even mobility accessibility: relocation of employment, residential mobility, family breakdown or health problems. Thus, daily mobility behaviours are subject to changes that may be both short-term (e.g. changes in schedules or itineraries, changes in the destination, etc.) or long-term, particularly following biographical events (e.g. birth of a child, divorce, or marriage) (Scheiner, 2018). In long-term perspective, covered by the concept of "mobility biographies" (Lanzendorf, 2003), there are few studies that discuss impacts on ordinary daily mobility behaviours related to these mobility biographies, especially in their intensity and predictability. On the one hand, research dedicated to daily mobility and related to biographical transitions are growing (e.g. special issue of Transportation Research Part A (Zhang, Van Acker, 2017)). On the other hand, research related to biographical bifurcations are often confined to situations dealing with inequalities or with key moments in the life course, such as aging or family life (Lord et al. 2015; Lord, Piché 2018). Whether in one or another time/life course framework, the questions allowing this kind of research are still ongoing. In this context, this symposium aims to bring together theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspectives on the evolution and changes of mobility behaviours according to two main notions in current research: "transitions" and "bifurcations" that households and individuals are living. The following questions can be raised: Do the notion used for bifurcation and transition reflect a biographical reality experienced by individuals? Does a bifurcation lead to more changes in mobility routines than a transition? What is the role of socio-spatial constraints and contexts (accessibility, urban forms, family and social networks, schedules, or types of activity) in behavioural changes following a biographical event? What is the evolution of mobility experiences according to social and cultural contexts? How do relationships to time and space evolve according to certain transitions? How to adapt mobility research methodologies to take into account biographical data and their analysis? What are the techniques available to account for changes in behaviour for long-term and short-term periods? 

10. Developing Patterns of Resilience through Deep Time

Convenor(s):

The relationship of people and the environment evolves over time, and through this process come traditional knowledge systems born of the close relationship to the land - traditional ecological knowledge. However, in the advent of outside influence, peoples’ relationship to the environment fracture. For example, generational knowledge is less able to respond to a foreign built-environment when environmental calamity occurs. This is evident in the built-environments of Japan, Haiti, and Indonesia in face of natural hazards. In the face of global climate change, the fracturing of traditional ecological knowledge becomes noticeable and communities once resilient are now vulnerable. Deep time both provides an analytical tool to understand the ecology of a place as well as the ecological evolution of a people and their relationship to that place. Through time, technology is developed to ensure the community’s sustainable relationship with the land. As outside influence, such as colonization and urbanization, fracture the resilient systems of communities, it has been widely believed that the integration of western scientific knowledge is necessary. Together, traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge can help combat climate change. This symposium aims to challenge this notion, placing a high value on the long evolution of traditional knowledge systems born of intricate people-environment relationships. Within indigenous populations, such as in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the concept of deep time proves an effective analytical tool in uncovering resilient patterns in people-environment relationships. Deep time demonstrates forms of knowledge that can stitch together fractured knowledge systems and address the wounds of vulnerability, once again aiding societies in climate change adaptation and resilience. This is apparent in the national strategy for coastal and land management, Reimaanlok. However, these strategies fall short in the colonial built-environment of the urban center. Can deep time provide a new image for the modern city? This symposium will bring together experts in the field of people-environment studies to discuss the role of deep-time in their work and express how patterns of sustainable people-environment relationships develop throughout time. The application of these deep-time patterns into frameworks for contemporary issues in climate change resilience will be discussed from a wide array of focal points. Bringing design practitioners, indigenous and non-indigenous, will provide grounds for a lively debate concerning scholarly pursuits and design practice based on traditional knowledge, deep-time, and climate change.

11. From mitigation to adaptation behaviors: Understanding resilience and its long-term challenges

Convenor(s):

As the reality of climate change is upon us, research agendas are expanding to consider both mitigation and the impacts of adaptation. It is more urgent than ever to focus on adapting and becoming resilient to environmental change and to reflect on the implications of the change over time from planning for change to reactive management. This symposium intends to explore different aspects of contemporary resilience for mitigation of and adaptation to climate change and to the consequent increasing natural hazards frequency. As society has moved from aversion to reaction, everyday resilience has also necessarily evolved over time. The symposium will present some of the most recent findings on mitigation, more specifically with regards to the motivations behind the engagement of citizens in mitigation-related pro-environmental behaviors and on actions that reduce human impact on climate. The main focus will be on adaptation to climate change and, more broadly, to natural hazards. A recent meta-analysis highlighted how several social-psychological variables affect the enacting of adaptation-related behaviors (van Valkengoed & Steg, 2019) and how while some of these variables have already been deeply investigated (e.g., risk perception and previous experience), some others are mostly unexplored and need more research (e.g., social norms, self-efficacy, and place attachment). The goal of the symposium is thus to present most recent findings, with a focus on the understudied social-psychological antecedents of resilient behaviors in these contexts. According to risk management literature, adaptation to natural hazards consists in reaching an individual and community resilience at all the different temporal phases of the natural hazard management: before the emergency rises (preparedness), during the emergency phase itself (response), and after the emergency (recovery). Contributions dealing with all temporal phases of natural hazard management are thus accepted. Moreover, since resilience is both built at the individual and at the community level, studies that focus on both personality and social variables in the context of natural hazards are also welcome. Finally, in order to more concretely understand how to tackle this issue in policy-making contexts, researchers working on the communication and on the acceptability of adaptation solutions (e.g., local policies, infrastructures) are invited to join. Silvia Ariccio will introduce the symposium’s works and Marino Bonaiuto will serve as the symposium’s discussant. The intention is to highlight the importance of mixed methods to investigate these issues (qualitative studies, quantitative studies, experimental studies, computational simulations, etc) and to engage discussion about how relevant and urgent it is to better understand antecedents and consequences of resilience in order to be able to increase it and to not only mitigate climate change, but also adapt to the forthcoming world. The final discussion will consider commonalities across mitigation and adaptation processes, how societies and individuals have moved over time from prevention to balancing both prevention and adaptation.

12. Renovating public schools for future generations: an international comparison of programs and approaches

Convenor(s):

In several countries, the stock of schools is being renovated or in need of it, several decades after a massive building of educational institutions due to the generalization and the lengthening of schooling and to the babyboom. The aging of the buildings itself entails the necessity of this work. In parallel, many society changes put pressure on the uses of those buildings and on their purposes : the apparition of new society orientations such as the reduction of the environmental footprint, the encouragement of healthy lifestyle habits or the existence of closer ties with communities; new uses of school spaces, especially with changes in education, in education curriculum, in the socialization of young people (Dubet, 2010), and the addition of support functions (Tardif & Levasseur, 2010); then more global the evolution of technologies and the variable place of digital technology in the transmission of culture. On the other hand, on the institutional level, pedagogical approaches, whether they are old or more recent, can divert the intended uses planned by the designers of school spaces (Derouet-Besson, 1999), whereas the plurality of the purposes and uses of the same spaces can generate tensions between the users (Zoïa & Visier, 2016). When there are school renovations, how can we create places to accommodate human relations, as well as school and social transformations characterizing the relations between generations? How can concerns for culture and the environment be considered (Costes, 2009)? What kind of architectural approaches are proposed to take into account those changes?  The main goal of our symposium is to compare the challenges met by school renovation in different countries, as well as the renovation programs and collaborative approaches put forward to address not only immediate needs but those needs of futures generations.

13. Using Familiar, but Diverse, Methodologies to Help People adapt to new Technologies in Contemporary Environments

Convenor(s):

 

The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is the country’s largest research organization. Its mandates are to conduct research that supports Canadian industry, advances government priorities, and contributes to the sum of human knowledge. These mandates blend in the work performed at the NRC Construction Research Centre, where interdisciplinary teams of behavioural scientists, engineers, physicists and physiologists study emerging technologies that hold promise to improve the built environment and contribute to achieving sustainability goals, including reduced carbon emissions. NRC’s behavioural scientists seek to understand how people experience their environments in order to ensure that conditions created in those environments, or using the new technologies, continue to support the people in them. The best outcomes are when our work can lead to sustainable changes to the built environment that also improve the occupant experience. When efforts to achieve environmental goals also improve our places, they will be more likely to be adopted.

Environmental psychologists in this group use the full range of research methods, from laboratory experiments to environmental simulations, to mail-in surveys and field studies. A key element in all of the work is interdisciplinary connections with engineering, physics, design, architecture and other disciplines. Whereas the behavioural science methodologies in this symposium will be familiar to most, the roles of allied scientists and engineers will be less familiar. Each presentation in this symposium represents a different setting – from offices to homes to aircraft – and collectively they cover a broad range of research methods.

The blending of expertise in these research teams also provides pathways to apply the results in real contexts. The interdisciplinary communication skills that develop from participating in integrated research teams help us to successfully contribute to relevant built environment industry, standards, design, and regulatory groups where the results are applied. Each presentation will describe how we identify to whom the results might be relevant, and how we endeavour to connect with relevant professions and groups, from manufacturers to architects to the publishers of codes and standards. These knowledge mobilization efforts can also close the circle by leading to new research questions for subsequent investigations.

The symposium is open to similar research experiences that will :

  • provide the audience with a view to how diverse professionals can come together to accomplish investigations that individuals could not address in isolation;

  • introduce novel approaches to studying new environmental technologies;

  • provide illustrations for non-traditional pathways to knowledge mobilization for this research.

14. Recovering the past to plan the future: Walkability as an alternative for sustainable mobility in cities

Convenor(s):

 

There is global concern to find out alternative forms of mobility to mitigate the effects of climate change in cities. Exploring alternative means of mobility includes encouraging the use of public transport powered by non-polluting energy sources, such as bicycles and skateboards. We know walking is important; it is recognized as a physical activity that contributes to health, initiates social encounters and recreation, and is part of the dynamic mechanism of social inclusion. However, few efforts are being made to include walkability in the design of cities as a way to mitigate the impact of climate change. To promote walkability as an alternative means of mobility, and to avoid the use of particular vehicles, it is essential to adjust urban design to the necessary conditions so that walkability can become a viable option, i.e. efficient as well as motivating and exciting for people. The general objective of the symposium is to discuss walkability as an alternative means of sustainable urban mobility, particularly in times of climate change. It will be based on some studies that gather the historical, phenomenological, social and evaluative experience on how walkable cities used to be, as well as the experience gathered through technical indicators, psychometric instruments and qualitative approaches in the current times. As for the theoretical background, some concepts of environmental psychology will be developed at the symposium, such as place appropriation, gender and spatiality, pro-environmental and socio-spatial behavior, and responsible urban behaviors. As for the practical implications, the symposium will present the indicators, psychometric instruments and qualitative protocols that are being used in the assessment of urban walkability.

15. Inhabitant Photo-elicitation Interviews Reported to Architects Who Designed a Building

Convenor(s):

 

Architectural practice has been mostly left unaffected by social science research. The bulk of architectural production is still carried out with little evidence of being informed by social science research, mostly relying on intuition and experience to serve inhabitant needs. Focusing on ethnographic photo-elicitation and academy/practice collaborations, this symposium provides a case study of an architecture class where students report to architects who designed a building: Photo-elicitation interviews with inhabitants in which interviewees are asked to use their own criteria and experience using a building to identify what works and what needs improvement; and Environment-Behavior literature related to interviewee responses. Architects provide client intentions, code, budget, and technical restrictions to students. Based on the collected information, architects and students together propose design interventions to improve existing buildings where possible, or design future buildings accommodating needs not met in current buildings.

16. Re-conceptualizing architectural and urban design education through a people-centred 

multidisciplinary integrative approach

Convenor(s):

  • Dina Shehayeb, Nile University, DShehayeb@nu.edu.eg

  • Ashraf Salama, University of Strathclyde

  • Ferdinando Fornara, University of Cagliari

Global recipes of architectural design led by real estate developers of homes, work environments and service facilities had been built over the years, following narrow definitions of function, blind to contextual and cultural factors, and hardly in sync with the experience of city life and city dynamics. Virtual environments and technological advances are rapidly infiltrating our lifestyle. Architectural education needs to qualify students to intervene in the rapidly changing systems and processes of human settlements and have the capacity to reconnect people and place in a dynamic synergy that leads to positive impacts on human well-being. The architect needs to be an agent of social and spatial evolution towards a better ecological harmony in its broadest sense. While some master programs offer the missing ingredients to provide young architects, undergraduate architecture education lags behind and suffers shortcomings. A 3-year project co-funded by the European Commission titled “Integrative Multidisciplinary People-centered Architecture Qualification and Training,” - IMPAQT, brought together a consortium of experts and academics to develop and implement a 5-year bachelor degree program as well as 4 tracks of Life-long Learning courses for practitioners aiming at overcoming these shortcomings through an integrative, multidisciplinary, people-centered approach, while utilizing ICT enabling technologies. The starting point was a multi-method, international, gap analysis that revealed the persisting problems and challenges related to architecture education. Two years into this project, has resulted in the development of forty-five courses, an integrative structure for the 5-year degree, a practicum-based blended learning pedagogy, a virtual reality lab, as well as the implementation of the first 2 years of the undergraduate program and several Life-long Learning courses. The aim of the symposium is to share and discuss the results of this project with others who attempted to address the following challenges in architecture education: integrating scales from a single room to part of a city, factoring human aspects into all subjects of the curriculum, reconciling explanatory and normative theory, integrating research into the design process, reinstating the human being at the center of sustainable development (going beyond the measurable dimensions of environmental aspects), utilizing technological advances as enablers rather than drivers, and developing trans-disciplinary concepts and tools that can bridge the gap between architecture and urban design on the one hand, and other disciplines. These challenges revolve around mainstreaming People – Environment relations in the multiple facets of architectural and urban design education.

17. Sins of omission: "The environment's in trouble, but I'm not doing much to ameliorate the problem"

Convenor(s):

 

Some assert that the solutions to environmental problems lie in stronger regulations, curbing harmful industry practices, or technical innovations, but the fundamental driver of change is the decision-making of 7.7 billion individuals, who often understand the problem but do little to help overcome it. Why? We are hindered by many “dragons of inaction” (Gifford, 2011) a comprehensive set of psychological barriers to real action. These dragons of inaction can, and must, be slain--although this will take great effort--through a combination of carefully targeted messages, enabling infrastructure, spreading social norms, effective feedback, feasible goal-setting, appropriate rewards, and the development of green identity that lead, via social licence, to effective leadership and equitable policies. These steps must be taken immediately. We do not have decades to ease our profligate spewing of greenhouse gases, manage the blows they have already have caused, and prevent even stronger negative impacts. This symposium explores the bases for this inaction in several environmental domains, and suggest paths forward. Among the topics that will be addressed, studies from Canadian researchers investigating residential energy conservation, perception of environmentalists, sustainable food choices, and story-based information as influencers.

18. The role of lighting design for walking in urban settings

Convenor(s):

The United Nations Agenda 2030 highlights the importance of making cities available for all citizens, through providing access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations (e.g. women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons).

Current regional and national guidelines also stress the necessity to adopt strategies for creating sustainable cities, through a shift towards more sustainable modes of transport, such as walking and cycling.

The quality of built environment plays an important role in supporting walking among all groups in society. In particular, the public outdoor lighting is vital in ensuring visual accessibility and also, perceived safety of the environment during the hours of darkness. This requires and understanding of how outdoor lighting contributes to the overall experience of the urban environment and how such experiences affect walking among different groups of people with different needs.

This symposium aims to bring attention to the role of lighting design to walking. The included presentations will discuss theoretical and methodological issues related to pedestrians’ experiences of different outdoor lighting designs across cultures, the psychological processes associated with these experiences, and how these experiences play into walking behaviour also among vulnerable groups in society. The Human-Environment Interaction model which states that the interaction between individual and his/her surrounding activates a basic emotional process that influences the individual’s experience of the lit environment and therefore, behavioural responses, is introduced as the overarching lens to understand the topic. The symposium report results from empirical studies based on mixed methods approaches, for example studies combining observations of pedestrians’ walking behaviour with interviews on perceived lighting quality and safety in the walking environment. Moreover, the symposium exemplifies how the urban artificially lit environment can be evaluated with respect to both technical and user aspects, and how such evaluations have guided municipalities in implementations of new energy efficient outdoor lighting applications. Furthermore, the integration of theories and methods to understand the psychological processes associated with walking experiences in education on sustainable urban design will be presented.

19. Time, health and sustainability in work and life – new ways of working at universities, outdoors offices, and urban co-living

Convenor(s):

  • Lucia Rotenberg, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, lucia.rotenberg@gmail.com

  • Susanna Toivanen, Mälardalen University and Stockholm University

Temporal and spatial dimensions of work and life have been challenged in the last decades due to the advancement of information and communication technology and work intensification. On the one hand, in several occupations, there is a blurring of the boundaries between professional and private life, thus making online working possible anytime and anywhere. On the other hand, innovative ways of sharing living and working space indoors and outdoors are presently developed to enhance sustainability. Thus, new kinds of social interactions are taking place in contemporary societies, strongly affecting People-Environment relations. In the context of these changes and challenges, the objective of this symposium is to explore and discuss new ways of dealing with time-space relationships at work and in private life. Our point of departure is social acceleration as introduced by sociologist Hartmut Rosa, a phenomenon derived from technological acceleration, social changes acceleration as well as the current accelerated pace of life. We will discuss health and ethical consequences of social acceleration exemplified with ongoing research into temporal and spatial changes of university teachers’ working conditions. We will present examples from research into outdoors office work as a way to support urban green environments and health in working life. Further, we will discuss experiences of urban co-living, a new way of sharing living space and its effects on participants’ self-compassion, and possibilities to enhance social and individual sustainability. In sum, the symposium will give the audience an opportunity to discuss challenges and possibilities of new ways of dealing with time and space, and the potential effects on sustainability including aspects of people’s health and well-being. 

 

 

20. Research Methods’ Timeline: 50 years of People-Environment Studies 

Convenor(s):

  • Ana Karinna Hidalgo, University of Regina, University of Calgary, akhidalg@ucalgary.ca

  • Tony Craig, The James Hutton Institute 

  • Carole Després, Université Laval

Over the last 50 years, studies of people-environment relationships have been developed in multiple disciplines. Throughout this time, a constant question has been how to improve people’s well-being in the various places we use or experience at different moments of the day, different times of the year, and at different stages of life. This has resulted in a significant amount of research work concerning the influence of built and natural environments on human health, wellbeing and behaviour more generally. The use of scientific evidence to inform design and policies has gradually made its way into both the public and private sectors, mostly in the context of institutional buildings and urban planning. Meta-reviews, systematic reviews and literature search are conducted on different topics to gather strong evidence in order to help designers and policy-makers expand their knowledge base and make evidence-informed decisions.

 

How researchers in these areas have been addressing such concerns requires more critical analysis. This symposium looks at contributions that discuss research methods used in people-environment studies along this 50-year timeframe. A first question to be answered is how researchers in people-environment studies are actually contributing to well-being, environmental issues, health, and other current issues from a methodological perspective. A second question relates to how the findings resulting from different methods have shaped theory, policies and guidelines and ultimately places. A third question examines the genealogy of scientific evidence in literature reviews and the rigour interpreting findings from past studies. We would like to contrast the resulting findings addressing same issues but using different methods towards understanding the diversity, complexities and even mistakes along the research in people-environment studies. The symposium concludes on an open discussion on the research methods being used in P-E research, on the ones that should be taught, and on new ones that need to be further developed.

21. Addressing Youth Incarceration: Trauma and Decarceration in Research and Practice

Convenor(s):

  • Julia Williams Robinson

  • Barbara Toews

Internationally, there are significant changes in the treatment of youth who have gotten into trouble with the law, previously managed primarily with incarceration. These changes are in response to three ideas: 1) the realization that treating underlying causes of youth problems, such as mental illness and addiction may be more effective than incarceration in addressing troubled youth, 2) the awareness that many youth get into trouble in response to traumatizing treatment at home or in their community [the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (2011) found 80% of young people in custody had experienced multiple traumatic stressors), and 3) the decarceration movement that advocates the elimination of incarceration altogether, arguing that traditional punitive detention facilities are ineffective and damaging.

Although such important ideas have transformed treatment of youth in countries such as Germany and Norway, they are only beginning to influence treatment in other countries, such as those presented in this session. This symposium presents research and design that advance trauma-informed treatment and decarceration in different countries, namely in Australia, Canada and the United States, with the objective of providing information about the new approaches to youth rehabilitation that link research to design implementation.

The field of Environment Behavior Studies (EBS) posits that the environment is a significant force in the way that people live their lives. For those who are interested in creating positive futures for youth who have transgressed the law, the designed environment can be a powerful tool to support transformative programs, communicating values like dignity, identity, and calm. For design to be used to prevent youth incarceration, or support therapeutic and rehabilitative treatment, research on existing environments, and proposals for opportunistic design need to explore why, where, how, design can be effective, and what should be designed.

The symposium papers represent a variety of approaches to the study and design of settings for youth rehabilitation,  among which methods for designing and evaluating youth settings including participatory design techniques and evidence-based design, as well as behavioral design approach to youth treatment. The first hour of the symposium will be short presentations of the research and design work, with the last half hour devoted to questions and discussion.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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